20 Diabetes Statistics Illustrating the Alarming State of This Disease (2020)

Last modified: October 11, 2020

The latest global diabetes statistics show how critical it is to battle this condition, especially in high-risk environments like the US.

The global diabetes rates show just how major a health concern this condition is, especially in extremely high-risk environments like the US. This health condition can develop due to a range of factors. Under optimal circumstances, physicians tend to recommend lifestyle changes and healthy-eating tips for prevention, but most importantly, diabetes is best treated at its earliest stage. Nevertheless, even a “better late than never” approach is better than nothing.

Diabetes is known as an underlying agent for much more serious health risks, which is why keeping up with diabetes statistics and the latest breakthroughs in the field are of crucial importance. After all, many diabetes patients claim they were unaware of their condition, mainly due to a lack of proper education on the matter.

The following facts and numbers are just an outline of the condition’s massive impact, yet they’re disturbing enough to get people thinking about diabetes as the issue it has become.

10 Quick Diabetes Facts & Stats 

  • 30.3 million people in the US have diabetes.
  • There will be 200 million new cases of diabetes by 2045 according to new projections.
  • India has recorded one of the highest diabetes death rates, at 997,803.
  • France and China don’t have national type 1 diabetes registries yet.
  • Diabetes ranks 7th in the US among the most common causes of death.
  • In 2009–2010, diabetes accounted for more deaths than breast cancer and AIDS together.
  • Kidney failure and limb amputations are among the more common consequences of diabetes.
  • Obese or overweight people make up about 85% of all type 2 diabetes patients.
  • 9 out of 10 adults with prediabetes in the US aren’t aware that they have it.
  • The total cost of diabetes in the US for 2017 was estimated at $327 billion.

Diabetes Statistics in the US

1. More than 30 million US residents have diabetes, both diagnosed and undiagnosed.

The steady rise of this disease is most evident in the United States, where an estimated 30.3 million people, or 9.4% of the entire population, have the disease. Out of these, 23.1 million have actually gone to a medical institution and have been diagnosed with the disease. Meanwhile, nearly a quarter (7.2 million people), aren’t officially diagnosed. In other words, the stats on diabetes indicate that up to 23.8% of all people with diabetes are undiagnosed.

Source: CDC

2. The annual mortality rate for diabetes is higher than that of breast cancer and AIDS combined in the US. 

Breast cancer is one of the leading health risks in women, while HIV/AIDS was once known to be unstoppable. According to the latest assessments in the US, both of these health conditions have been completely surpassed by diabetes mortality rates alone. More specifically, reports show that breast cancer has been responsible for 40,676 deaths, and HIV/AIDS took 21,601 lives in 2009, while diabetes recorded up to 69,201 deaths in 2010.

Source: American Diabetes Association

3. The more educated you are, the less likely you are to get diabetes.

A strange correlation has been discovered between the education levels of US residents and the prevalence of diabetes among different groups. Up to 12.6% of US adults with less than a high school level education have diabetes, while only 9.5% of high school educated adults have been recorded suffering from the disease. Ultimately, when it comes to US adults with an education level greater than high school, only 7.2% have diabetes.

Source: CDC

4. 200 million new cases of diabetes are expected by the year 2045 worldwide.

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has come up with the latest stats and facts about the condition in global terms. As things stand, the recent reports from 2017 count 425 million adults already living with the disease, and they predict a notably high increase in this number, reaching 629 million patients by 2045.

Source: International Diabetes Federation

5. The following table covers general stats on diabetes across 40 countries globally:

Country/ Territory IDF Region Adults with Diabetes (20–79 Years) in 1,000s Diabetes Age-Adjusted (20–79) Comparative Prevalence Adults with Undiagnosed Diabetes (20–79) in 1,000s Mean Diabetes-Related Expenditure per Person (20–79) with Diabetes (R=2,USD) Diabetes-Related Deaths (20–79)
Argentina SACA 1,757.5 5.5% 629.8 907.0 2,012
Australia WP 1,133.0 5.1% 403.8 7,820.5 4,576
Austria EUR 592.0 6.4% 211.7 6,554.2 2,861
Barbados NAC 35.6 13.6% 9.3 1,363.9 294
Belgium EUR 500.8 4.3% 179.1 6,150.1 2,806
Brazil SACA 12,465.8 8.1% 5,734.3 1,405.9 108,587
Canada NAC 2,603.2 7.4% 793.6 6,519.5 11,303
China WP 11,4394.8 9.7% 61,294.0 549.4 842,994
Croatia EUR 219.0 5.6% 92.0 1,266.3 1,628
Denmark EUR 386.7 6.4% 253.6 7,768.8 2,210
Egypt MENA 8,222.6 17.3% 4,367.0 268.4 71,293
Finland EUR 370.3 5.8% 224.4 5,378.5 2,063
France EUR 3,276.4 4.8% 1,228.3 6,123.9 18,305
Germany EUR 7,476.8 8.3% 2,555.4 5,891.1 40,198
Guatemala SACA 752.7 10.2% 269.7 398.5 7,709
Hungary EUR 706.8 7.5% 117.8 1,224.0 8,584
India SEA 72,946.4 10.4% 42,210.3 119.4 997,803
Ireland EUR 141.5 3.3% 50.6 5,975.4 704
Israel EUR 415.8 6.7% 148.7 4,162.1 1,888
Italy EUR 3,402.3 4.8% 1216.4 3,700.8 14,549
Japan WP 7,234.2 5.7% 3,368.6 3,925.4 70,347
Kenya AFR 458.9 2.9% 165.2 153.7 7,865
Lebanon MENA 585.4 12.7% 251.4 773.7 5,530
Luxembourg EUR 24.6 4.4% 8.8 10,680.3 118
Maldives SEA 18.4 9.2% 10.0 1,894.8 112
Mexico NAC 12,030.1 13.1% 4,504.1 957.3 85,932
Morocco MENA 1,641.9 7.1% 705.2 294.6 9,977
Nepal SEA 657.2 7.3% 532.1 70.8 11,693
New Zealand WP 326.1 8.1% 83.8 6,090.0 1,374
Pakistan MENA 7,474.0 8.3% 4,594.3 62.4 79,354
Peru SACA 1,130.8 5.9% 452.3 565.7 7,129
Poland EUR 2,235.8 5.9% 1,008.1 1,153.7 18,096
Singapore WP 606.0 11.0% 327.1 3,268.2 4,387
Spain EUR 3,584.5 7.2% 1,017.6 3,045.0 15,557
Sweden EUR 499.3 4.8% 178.5 8,356.0 2,221
Thailand WP 4,208.6 7.0% 1,849.4 310.0 44,045
United Kingdom EUR 2,747.7 4.3% 508.3 4,988.6 14,593
Venezuela SACA 1,311.4 6.5% 469.9 1,417.7 10,242
Vietnam WP 3,535.7 6.0% 1,887.9 216.6 29,068
Zimbabwe AFR 99.4 1.8% 75.9 117.2 2,757

Source: International Diabetes Federation

Type 1 Diabetes Rates & Statistics

6. Type 1 diabetes accounts for 5% of adult cases of diabetes.

Type 1 diabetes can develop at any point in one’s life due to unknown defects in the human body. According to the latest data, this type of diabetes accounts for about 5% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in adults.

Source: CDC

7. Of those who are diabetic, the rates indicate that about 18,000 young people are annually diagnosed with the type 1 variant.

Type 1 diabetes is a variant of the condition where the human body can’t produce its own insulin. In most cases, these patients need to take regular injections to regulate their levels and ensure proper functions. In the US alone, nearly 18,000 youth are newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes each year.

Sources: Diabetes Research Institute Foundation, American Diabetes Association

8. France and China don’t have national registries for people with Type 1 diabetes yet.

These two nations don’t have any country-level reports of the number of people suffering from type 1 diabetes. Nevertheless, this isn’t to say that there aren’t any—their records are most likely in the respective hospitals in both countries.

Source: Beyond Type 1

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics

9. Obesity is among the key factors increasing the probability of getting type 2 diabetes.

Old age, a family history of diabetes, and lack of exercise are other key factors affecting a person’s chances of developing diabetes. Nevertheless, obesity is one of the leading drivers, further proven by the fact that up to 85.2% of patients with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese.

Source: Medical News Today, American Diabetes Association

10. The survival rate of diabetes among type 2 patients becomes significantly worse when cardiovascular disease is in the mix.

A new study has found that with proper control and management of specific risk factors, a diabetes patient can extend their life and improve its overall quality. These five key risk factors are blood pressure, long-term blood glucose, lipid status, renal function, and smoking. By giving up smoking, taking the right medications, and introducing a healthier lifestyle, patients drastically lowered their risk of cardiovascular disease.

Source: The New England Journal of Medicine

11. Between 2002 and 2012, the annual increase rate of type 1 diabetes in people in the US was 1.8%, while for type 2, it was 4.8%.

The US has recorded significantly rising numbers of type 2 diabetes patients, and obesity is one of the main contributors to this result. According to data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), almost 40% of adults are seriously obese. What’s more, 18.5% of children and adolescents aged 2–19 are obese.

Source: Medical News Today, The State of Obesity 

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics

12. Obesity is among the key factors increasing the probability of getting type 2 diabetes.

Old age, a family history of diabetes, and lack of exercise are other key factors affecting a person’s chances of developing diabetes. Nevertheless, obesity is one of the leading drivers, further proven by the fact that up to 85.2% of patients with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese.

Source: Medical News Today, American Diabetes Association

13. The survival rate of diabetes among type 2 patients becomes significantly worse when cardiovascular disease is in the mix.

A new study has found that with proper control and management of specific risk factors, a diabetes patient can extend their life and improve its overall quality. These five key risk factors are blood pressure, long-term blood glucose, lipid status, renal function, and smoking. By giving up smoking, taking the right medications, and introducing a healthier lifestyle, patients drastically lowered their risk of cardiovascular disease.

Source: The New England Journal of Medicine

14. Between 2002 and 2012, the annual increase rate of type 1 diabetes in people in the US was 1.8%, while for type 2, it was 4.8%.

The US has recorded significantly rising numbers of type 2 diabetes patients, and obesity is one of the main contributors to this result. According to data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), almost 40% of adults are seriously obese. What’s more, 18.5% of children and adolescents aged 2–19 are obese.

Source: Medical News Today, The State of Obesity 

Diabetes Mortality Rates and Statistics

15. In the US, adults with diabetes are much more likely to die of a heart attack or stroke.

The state of healthy lifestyles in the US may well be the reason for high mortality rates among diabetes patients. What’s even more alarming about this is the fact that heart attack is the number-one leading cause of death in the US, and stroke is ranked fifth.

Source: Medical News Today

16. Diabetes is ranked as the 7th leading cause of death in the US.

The diabetes rates on mortality are based on data showing diabetes to be the underlying cause in 79,535 deaths in the US every year. Moreover, it’s been listed as an underlying or contributing cause of death to a total of 252,806 deaths in the US annually.

Source: American Diabetes Association

17. Hearing loss, kidney failure, and limb amputations are among the most common consequences of diabetes.

Just in 2014, up to 52,159 people developed end-stage chronic kidney disease because of diabetes. About 60% of all non-traumatic limb amputations have also been noted as occurring due to diabetes complications. Ultimately, hearing loss is yet another side-effect, and it’s twice as likely to occur in diabetics.

Source: Diabetes Research Institute Foundation

18. 193,000 kids and young adults below the age of 20 have been diagnosed with diabetes.

The age group below the age of 20 has seen approximately 193,000 cases of diabetes (type 1 or type 2). This means that as much as 0.24% of all youngsters in this age range already suffer a variant of this health condition.

Source: Diabetes Research Institute Foundation

19. Gestational diabetes is estimated to occur in 2%–10% of pregnancies in the US.

This form of diabetes appears during pregnancy, and it’s normally expected to return to normal after birth, although some evidence suggests that women with gestational pregnancies are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes later on. Most diabetes facts also confirm that children born under such circumstances are also more likely to develop diabetes.

Source: Healthline

20. 84.1 million adults in the US have prediabetes.

This is equivalent to 1 out of 3 adults in the US having a condition that could lead to type 2 diabetes. The worst part is that 9 out of 10 of these adults aren’t even aware of the fact that they have prediabetes.

Source: CDC

The Cost of Diabetes

21. In the case of diabetes, people with this disease have medical costs 2.3 times greater than those without it.

Final calculations point to the fact that diabetes patients need to pay 2.3 times more in health care fees than those not suffering from this condition.

Source: American Diabetes Association

Of this total, $237 billion is from direct costs associated with the disease, and $90 billion is related to reduced productivity.

Source: American Diabetes Association

23. Productivity loss is another $20.8 billion cost on the US budget.

In 2012, the ADA estimated the cost of reduced productivity of diabetes patients in the workplace. The results showed that the productivity loss was 113 million days, or roughly $20.8 billion.

Source: Medical News Today

Conclusion

This simple overview of 20 diabetes statistics and facts is more than enough to indicate the alarming state of affairs in the US. With unhealthy lifestyles leading the way, not to mention the expensive yet numerous treatments required for maintaining a good quality of life, people are torn by this medical condition.

When it comes to managing diabetes, prevention and precautionary measures are best applied at the earliest stage possible. This way, those who have the disease can still lead relatively comfortable lives. As the diabetes statistics show—and patients will confirm—regular examinations and lifestyle changes can take you a long way.

FAQs

How many people are affected by diabetes?

The latest estimates show that about 30.3 million people are affected by diabetes, although almost a third of them aren’t even aware of the fact.

How many people die of diabetes?

According to information from 2017 provided by the International Diabetes Federation, in the US alone, 176,740 deaths of adults aged 20–79 have been recorded as due to diabetes.

 

What percentage of diabetes patients have type 2

On average, approximately 95% of all adult diabetes patients have type 2 diabetes, and only 5% suffer from type 1 diabetes.

How much has the rate of diabetes increased over the years?

According to recent diabetes statistics, the number of diabetes patients has increased by 10 million since 2014, and the number is expected to rise up to a total of 39.7 million by 2030, and 60.6 million by 2060.

Has the risk of death increased for diabetes patients?

Adults who have diabetes are 50% more likely to die than their counterparts who don’t have diabetes. It’s estimated that they live about 6 years less than someone who doesn’t have diabetes.

List of Sources: